Radioteleskop Effelsberg

Radioteleskop Effelsberg

Bad Münstereifel


With a diameter of 100 metres, the Radio Telescope Effelsberg is one of the largest fully mobile radio telescopes on earth.  Since its commissioning in 1972, the company has continuously worked on improving its technology (e. g. B. a new surface of the antenna dish, better receivers for highquality data, extremely lownoise electronics) so that even today it is still considered one of the most modern telescopes in the world.  The telescope is used to observe pulsars, cold gas and dust clouds, star formation regions, matter jets emanating from black holes and the nuclei of distant galaxies.  Effelsberg is an important station for the worldwide interconnection of radio telescopes. With this technique, the sharpest images of the cosmos can be taken. In order to improve this technology, the Institute is working in several projects together with national and international research institutes and other organizations
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At a glance

Opening hours

  • Vom April 8th bis April 8th
    Monday
    00:00 - 23:59 Uhr

    Tuesday
    00:00 - 23:59 Uhr

    Wednesday
    00:00 - 23:59 Uhr

    Thursday
    00:00 - 23:59 Uhr

    Friday
    00:00 - 23:59 Uhr

    Saturday
    00:00 - 23:59 Uhr

    Sunday
    00:00 - 23:59 Uhr

Place

Bad Münstereifel

Contact

Radioteleskop Effelsberg
Max-Planck-Str. 28
53902 Bad Münstereifel

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